My interview on Raincity Radio


Just a quick note that my interview with Dave O from Raincity Studios has made its way to the web. Since that interview, our membership numbers have nearly quadrupled, but the basic message remains the same. Those Raincity guys are a lot of fun – Dave and I bonded over our love of hockey history. He especially loved the vintage 1916 Vancouver Millionaires jersey I was wearing (see pic). Any other Cyclone Taylor fans out there?

Boom!


In Turning the Generational Dial, Carol Orsborn (who works at Fleishman-Hillard, along with my good friend Jennifer Torney) makes the case that the generations that follow the Baby Boomers will be the first in all of history “not (to) have grown into adulthood anticipating the marginalized, invisible, powerless future boomers once expected to haveā€”but rather, the promise of lifelong vitality, relevant entertainment and the thriving careers at midlife and beyond that boomers pioneered.”

This, I find very interesting. I’ve heard it said that the web is for the young, that youthful early adopters (alone) are driving the new generation of applications we’re seeing on the web. I don’t believe it. I heard something at the Web 2.0 Expo regarding the demographics of users of the instructables website. I can’t for the life of me, find a link anywhere to it on the internet. If anyone can find something, please let me know. Instructables is a site where people post plans for projects that people can build themselves. The interesting tidbit was that Instructables users fall into two categories: posters and readers. Posters tend to be older (over 35) and readers tend to be younger (under 35). What’s interesting about that is how obvious it is. Older people passing their knowledge and skills onto younger people. How… human. One of the things the web 2.1 may give us is better access to an increasingly web-savvy older generation with more energy and more things to share than ever before. Maybe, I’m starting to get a sense of why I should care about the Wikia search engine project… Google lets you search what’s on the web, but how do you search somebody’s life experiences? That’s what I want. Anybody working on that?

Canuck Love in the Blogosphere

Canadian Bloggers of Note (the Z-list)

Co-Creation Rules!


Here’s a great manifesto I got from the folks over at Changethis: Co-Creation Rules. Written by James Cherkoff and Johnnie Moore, it gives 17 guidelines to those hoping to engage with their customers, Marketing Participation-style. I liked how they opened their essay, suggesting an exercise to the readers: Draw a picture with one of your colleagues. Using a single pen, and without speaking, take turns adding lines to draw a face, and then give it a name. Which one of you “owns” the picture? Does it look like anything you’ve drawn before individually? Can you imagine collaborating with your customers in this way to create a new product or campaign?

A new name for the Marketing department


Like many companies, Uniserve has a Marketing department. Today, I proposed to my colleagues we change the name of the Marketing Communications function (MarCom), to Marketing Participation (MarPa). Marketing is a conversation, and I think we need to be explicit: we are participating together with our customers in a conversation. What do you think of this?

This reminds me of a post that Ross Mayfield made a few months ago. Let’s see if I can find it (rummaging through bookmarks). Oh yes, here it is: Power Law of Participation.

“As we engage with the web, we leave behind breadcrumbs of attention. Even when we Read, our patterns are picked up in referral logs (especially with expressly designed tools, like Measure Map), creating a feedback loop. But reading alone isn’t enough to fulfill our innate desire to remix our media, consumption is active for consumers turned users.”

Consumption is active. We are what we eat. Culture is an activity.