Booksimreading: The Wealth of Networks…


As part of an effort to think more and do less, I just started reading a new book: “The Wealth of Networks; How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom“, by Yochai Benkler. What do I think so far, after the first 30 pages?

“At the beginning of the 21st century, we find our selves in the midst of a battle over the institutional ecology of the digital environment,” says Benkler. “What characterizes the networked information economy is that decentralized individual action plays a much greater role than it did or could have (before)”… “the removal of the physical constraints on effective information production has made human creativity and the economics of information itself the core structuring facts (of our economy and our society).” Just as the proprietors of the new printing presses of europe used their economic clout to gain independence from the church and aristocracy, people today, both individually and in groups, are exploiting the economics of the internet to take on massively ambitious projects. An important difference, though is that they are often taking on these projects just because they feel like it, and not for economic reasons.
Friendship Wheel Collage, by choconancy.
It’s this idea that first caused me to pick up this book, actually. The amplification of the individual human as a social creature, as opposed to a “market actor”. This is a major change in thinking for some. Capital is less important than it has been in the past. Groups of individuals, acting from motivations unrelated to economics, can often organize themselves more quickly and effectively than a corporation can. I find this idea exhilarating. More as I read along…

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Extending and enhancing an existing network


Here’s a comment to my previous blog post. It seems important enough to promote it to a post of it’s own. Personally, I walked away from the McCrae Alumni weekend very impressed. Here’s a group of people who have built a (human) network that transcends the institution that initialized it. Below is an example of the group’s internal discussion. Good suggestions, and thanks for letting me be a part of the unfolding dialogue.

Hey thanks for buying the power assited bike Michael.

I think I asked a question about effective practices that each McRae alum could engage in immediately: (1) on existing social networks like Linkedin, Facebook and MySpace, and (2) what are the most effective ways we can project our power as a network, i.e., what are some good examples of other successful networks of people who have projected power?

A couple of answers that occurred to me:
RE: effective practices on existing social networks …

  • we need to be consistent in the name we use for our program. Because “the Program” has changed names some call it McRae, other APMCP, others Cap. Consistent name and tags would make our profiles and comments easier to find,
  • be a good follower. Charles Caldwell introduce many of us McRae folks to Linked in within a year of its founding, most of us didn’t take it seriously. Many still have not spend a lot of time moving their contacts in. I didn’t spend anytime on Linkedin until I noticed that a guy who is at least 5 years older than me and commands millions (maybe billions) of investment funds and put $50-million into our project in China had 80 contacts there. For example, if someone opens McRae Facebook group … join, comment … it take seconds.
  • do business with fellow alum, refer them for jobs, collaborate, coinvest, help your fellow lobsters out of the pot (Canadians usually spend thier time pulling each other back into the pot! who said pot?),
  • practical recoms for the alum website – expand the profiles, add some mapping/geotagging, let each person add photos and attach business plans/documents to share to their profiles, add RSS feeds for each profile and the whole site so that when anyone contributes content the network gets the intel,
  • I wonder if now is the right stage for philanthropy efforts. Sure if a fellow alum is running for a cause by all means, but if we are raising $20,000 as a group for something, should we be reinvesting directly in the network (improve website, hire someone to write a report on where the alum network goes from here, particularly if Cap is out of the picture completely).

Good introductory presentation on the changes that are effecting everyone.
Thanks

You’re welcome. Thanks for letting me be a small part of it!

How to organize yourselves

This last weekend (August 23rd), I was speaking to Alumni of the McCrae Institute of International Management about the social shifts taking place today as a result of the Internet. “Groups of people can organize quickly and efficiently and make their voices heard,” I said. “The locus of control is shifting from corporations to people, with powerful implications for politics, marketing, product development.” In response, I got the obvious question: “how?” Recognizing that I took the answer to that question for granted a little, here is a short treatise on the ways groups of people (such as the McCrae Alumni) can make finding each other and getting together a little bit easier. In the end, you’ll need to have a motivated, passionate, and involved group of people to get anything done, of course. That problem hasn’t been solved with technology, at least not yet ;-).

  • Get involved in the Blogosphere. Create your own blog (typepad is good, so is wordpress. I use blogger). Find others who share your interest who blog, and comment on their blogs. Link to their blogs from your blog. Blog about their blogs. Strike up conversations. Talking, linking, and generally letting people know what you’re about and that you want to connect is how it all begins.
  • Get set up on LinkedIn. Make sure you fill out the “additional information” section at the bottom of your profile with relevant details of your interests and affiliations, and make sure your “contact settings” encourage people to contact you. Actively search for contacts, and invite people you know.
  • Find your friends on Facebook. I’m a little more wary of Facebook’s privacy policy and terms of service, but if you’re careful about not revealing non-essential information you should be fine. When you’re filling in your profile information, don’t forget to put information in the other tabs (to the right of the “basic” tab) that will make it easier for people to search for you.
  • Create or join a private or public discussion group. You can use Yahoo! Groups, Google groups, or Ning. Try to use them more than point-to-point communications like email and IM. These days, I like Pownce. …and I hear Jumpnote is going to totally kick butt when it comes out of alpha.
  • Most importantly, follow your passion: find out where people are already gathering and add your voice.

Hey Blogosphere: any other keen suggestions for a motivated and savvy, but loosely knit, group of people who are hoping to get more organized?

My first online social networking application (1982)

It was 1982, and I was calling into a music video show called “Soundproof” (1979-1983… big love out Buzz E. Miller and Dave Toddington!) on the North Shore Community Cable Channel. Ring. Ring. Ring. I was hoping to request Shrink’s “Paranoid” (anybody?), and I was waiting for the phone to pick up. They didn’t even have IVR to pick up and put you on hold, so we’d call and let it ring while we watched videos. One day, I was sitting on the couch at 1 AM, with the phone to my ear and I realized I could hear voices in between the rings. “Hello?” I said. To my surprise, somebody responded.
Dozens of us would call the request line and chat in between the rings. Can you imagine? “Oh yeah, I’m (ring) totally into Wall of (ring) Voodoo. ‘Callbox’ is the (ring) best song ever!”
Check out the article on page 8 of this old UBC student paper.
Warning: Some bad language in this video!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KNUnLaRekg

Boom!


In Turning the Generational Dial, Carol Orsborn (who works at Fleishman-Hillard, along with my good friend Jennifer Torney) makes the case that the generations that follow the Baby Boomers will be the first in all of history “not (to) have grown into adulthood anticipating the marginalized, invisible, powerless future boomers once expected to haveā€”but rather, the promise of lifelong vitality, relevant entertainment and the thriving careers at midlife and beyond that boomers pioneered.”

This, I find very interesting. I’ve heard it said that the web is for the young, that youthful early adopters (alone) are driving the new generation of applications we’re seeing on the web. I don’t believe it. I heard something at the Web 2.0 Expo regarding the demographics of users of the instructables website. I can’t for the life of me, find a link anywhere to it on the internet. If anyone can find something, please let me know. Instructables is a site where people post plans for projects that people can build themselves. The interesting tidbit was that Instructables users fall into two categories: posters and readers. Posters tend to be older (over 35) and readers tend to be younger (under 35). What’s interesting about that is how obvious it is. Older people passing their knowledge and skills onto younger people. How… human. One of the things the web 2.1 may give us is better access to an increasingly web-savvy older generation with more energy and more things to share than ever before. Maybe, I’m starting to get a sense of why I should care about the Wikia search engine project… Google lets you search what’s on the web, but how do you search somebody’s life experiences? That’s what I want. Anybody working on that?

Kinzin beta update

It wasn’t the worst I’ve seen, but I think it’s fair to say that the Kinzin launch wasn’t as smooth as we wanted. Anyway, Paul’s team is working fast and furious (quickly and furiously?) to get the holes patched and loops closed. In retrospect, I would say the Mother’s day promotion was too ambitious for the first release. Still, we’re getting more signups every day, so despite my own perception of the warts and flaws, there are people out there who are adopting and using Kinzin (a big “thank you” to any of you that might be listening). The next phase is going to focus on closing the loop on publishing and inviting, to make it more fun to create using Kinzin, and more obviously valuable to visit.

All together now (all together now)!

The great people that I work with at Uniserve (hello Paul, Kate (Trgovac), Dethe, Joanna, Kate (Inglis), Vince) have launched a great new product. It’s called Kinzin, and it’s a site where people can create many small, overlapping, family-centric social networks. It’s very cool, and the launch promotion right now is a free high-end custom photobook for a Mom in your family if you sign up and create a family space. It’s kind of in a public beta phase, and it would be excellent if you would sign up and try it out.

With families getting spread out geographically and bigger age gaps between generations, there are very few truly shared family spaces, where families can share and nurture their micro-cultures. Kinzin is an attempt to give people the tools to create those spaces for themselves. It’s just the beginning, too – there are all sorts of cool things coming down the pipe. Check it out!